Marry the Movement from Southerners on New Ground (SONG) on Vimeo.

The Supreme Court of the United States has issued many opinions affecting the lives of marginalized people across the country this week. We know that here in the South our SONG family will be grappling with the reality of our lives, many of which have been made worse by the Supreme Court’s rulings affecting Affirmative Action, the Voting Rights Act, the Indian Child Welfare Act and the 5th Amendment. 

While the court also struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Prop 8, SONG knows that all the good that can radiate out from those decisions is because the climate around the lives and realities of LGBTQ people in our country has changed. Why has it changed? Because LGBTQ people and our families, friends and allies have made it change. We have come out, we have transformed our lives and each other, and we have built power in countless ways. That work makes these moments happen AND we still have so much work to do together as LGBTQ people… the regression and contradictions of the decisions affecting People of Color in this country highlight that reality.

We know that in times like these we need each other and that we must turn to each other in the spirit of our collective survival. There is still much work to be done in order to bring the reality of true justice home to the South: so join us in Marrying the Movement until every LGBTQ person has full dignity, safety, and liberation.

"…I realized that I was a part of something bigger…I was a part of something honest and full of love…"
http://wp.me/p1CBWf-aA
"…I realized that I was a part of something bigger…I was a part of something honest and full of love…"

http://wp.me/p1CBWf-aA

SONG Joins Growing Number of LGBTQ Organizations in Opposition to the Atlanta Banishment Ordinance
"Sex workers are NOT the problem: lack of housing options, lack of educational opportunities and jobs, as well as violence, are the problems. As LGBTQ people we do not agree that banishing sex workers makes anyone or any place safer or better. On the contrary: if Atlanta banishes sex workers, then on the conscience of our City sits the very same community segregation we say we oppose, and the exile of people just trying to get by in a form of work that many privately participate in, but most condemn publicly. SONG will not stand by for this."

SONG Joins Growing Number of LGBTQ Organizations in Opposition to the Atlanta Banishment Ordinance

"Sex workers are NOT the problem: lack of housing options, lack of educational opportunities and jobs, as well as violence, are the problems. As LGBTQ people we do not agree that banishing sex workers makes anyone or any place safer or better. On the contrary: if Atlanta banishes sex workers, then on the conscience of our City sits the very same community segregation we say we oppose, and the exile of people just trying to get by in a form of work that many privately participate in, but most condemn publicly. SONG will not stand by for this."

For the last day of the People’s 100 Days, a southern regional social justice organizing campaign, SC SONG created a mobile interview booth called the Love Truck. Our crew rode around Charleston and interviewed folks about our right to remain as immigrants, people of color, and Southern LGBTQ folks.

This video is a rough compilation of moments from each interview.  The views expressed do not necessarily represent SONG’s views. We selected moments that we felt showed contradiction, honesty, and personal truth. We are excited for the opportunity to lift up these voices and continue building a Southern queer people of color movement in Charleston.